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Casuariidae - Cassowaries

 

Classification

 Phylum: Chordata
 Class: Aves
 Order: Struthioniformes
 Family: Casuariidae

CassowaryThere are three living species in this family. Cassowaries are found in rainforests in Australia, New Guinea, and surrounding islands.

They are around 6.5 feet tall and weigh up to 130 pounds. They have long legs, long necks, and rounded heads. They have long black feathers and blue and red featherless necks. Cassowaries have a casque on the top of their heads. Two species have wattles that hang from their necks. Females are usually larger and more brightly colored than males.

Cassowaries run at speeds of up to 30 mph and jump to heights of five feet. If a cassowary is threatened, it kicks out and attacks with its powerful legs and sharp, dagger-like claws.

The female cassowary lays 3-8 eggs. The male incubates the eggs for 50-60 days and cares for the chicks. The cassowary eats mostly fruits, but it also eats insects, small mammals, amphibians, and reptiles.

galleryCasuariidae Photo Gallery

World Status Key
Least Concern Least Concern Near Threatened Near Threatened Vulnerable Vulnerable Endangered Endangered Critically Endangered Critically Endangered extinct in the wild Extinct in the Wild extinct Extinct
Status and range is taken from ICUN Redlist. If no status is listed, there is not enough data to establish status.

US Status Key
Threatened in US Threatened in US Threatened in New Hampshire Threatened in NH Endangered in US Endangered in US Endangered in NH Endangered in NH Introduced Introduced
Status taken from US Fish and Wildlife and NH Fish and Game

  New Hampshire Species

 

 North/Central American Species

None   None

Other Species Around the World

Africa Africa Asia Asia Australia Australia/Oceania Europe Europe North America North/Central America South America South America New Hampshire Species NH Species

Dwarf Cassowary - Casuarius bennetti Near Threatened Australia
Southern Cassowary - Casuarius casuarius Vulnerable Australia
  Northern Cassowary - Casuarius unappendiculatus Vulnerable Australia

Additional Information

Key: profile Profile Photos Photos Video Video Audio Audio

Cassowary profile Photos Audio
The only bird heavier than the cassowary is the ostrich.
Source: San Diego Zoo Intended Audience: Students Reading Level: Middle School Teacher Section: Yes

Dwarf Cassowary - Casuarius bennetti profile Photos Video Near Threatened Australia
The dwarf cassowary is black with bright blue skin on its throat and neck.
Source: Arkive Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle School Teacher Section: Yes

Dwarf Cassowary - Casuarius bennetti profile Photos Near Threatened Australia
The dwarf cassowary is found in steep mountainous terrain at altitudes of up to 10,000 ft.
Source: Animal Diversity Web Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle School Teacher Section: Yes

Northern Cassowary -Casuarius unappendiculatus profile Photos Vulnerable Australia
The northern cassowary is found in the northern lowlands of New Guinea.
Source: Birdlife Intended Audience: General Reading Level: High School Teacher Section: Yes

Southern Cassowary - Casuarius casuarius profile Photos Video Vulnerable Australia
The name cassowary comes from the Papuan 'kasu' meaning horned and 'weri' meaning head.
Source: Arkive Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle School Teacher Section: Yes

Southern Cassowary - Casuarius casuarius profile Photos Vulnerable Australia
Southern cassowaries are found in lowland rainforests.
Source: Animal Diversity Web Intended Audience: General Reading Level: Middle School Teacher Section: Yes